The Lingo (Type 1 Diabetes)

Hello! As a Type 1 Diabetic myself, I am here to teach you some of the lingo, as well as some important information to have if you or a person close to you has diabetes. This is just the tip of the iceberg- so if there are specific terms or questions you have-feel free to leave a comment. πŸ™‚ Enjoy!

Phrases/Words You’ll Hear & What You Can Do:

  1. “I’m high”. If you’re in Portland there may be confusion *HOWEVER* in terms of diabetes this is referencing high blood glucose/sugar levels. Everyone has their own personal range where they are comfortable. But it’s safe to say the 160-200 and ABOVE is “high”. If yourself or your diabetic human is in need of assistance- they will need fast actin insulin to correct their sugar level. (Please ask your doctor or diabetic human what their correction ratio is before shooting up your friends.Thanks.)
  2. I’m low.” This is (as you can imagine) the opposite of a high blood sugar. Typically blood sugars below 80 will be considered a low blood sugar. A low blood sugar will be corrected with food/snack or juice. This is the one you or your diabetic human will most likely need your assistance if assistance is required. If you or your diabetic human is low- providing a fast acting snack such as: bananas, juice, gummy snacks, or something of that nature– is key. (Again please ask your doctor or diabetic human what their correction ration is before putting them in a sugar coma. Thanks.)
  3. “How many carbs are in that?” Often people think we track the sugars in our food. That is not the case. We base our boluses and low blood sugar corrections based of how many carbohydrates (minus the fiber) are in our food. In prepackaged foods you have have a look at the nutrition label and look for “carbohydrates” and subtract any fiber listed to get your total. For homemade or unpack aged foods some math and maybe a quick google search can tell you how many carbs in a serving.
  4. “BG/ Blood Glucose/ Blood Sugar.” BG stands for blood glucose. Blood glucose or blood sugars is the level of glucose/sugars currently in our blood. This is how we monitor and manage our diabetes. A person without diabetes will typically stay between 80-120. With type one diabetes, we have a slightly wider range (as we have to manually control it) but the closer we are to staying with in range- the closer we are to a fun and healthy life!
  5. “A1C” Our A1C is essentially our average glucose levels. As you can see in the chart below- what your average blood sugar is- aligns with a number that is: your A1C.

That is all for this blog and I hope this is useful for anyone who needs it! πŸ™‚ Again, please feel free to ask questions- any and all are welcome! Hope you all have a great day and I will chat with you all soon.

-Kayte

Some Diabetic Resources: